Fellowships and Student Support

Interested or current Nuclear Engineering students are encouraged to consider the following funding opportunities.

Nuclear Forensics Graduate Fellowship Program (NFGFP)

This fellowship program encourages these students to seek advanced education in technical areas related to nuclear forensics and provides incentives for universities to invest in and further develop radiochemistry and other nuclear forensics-related academic programs. The NFGFP gives highly motivated students an exceptional opportunity to apply their knowledge to enhance U.S. national security. As a key component of the broader National Nuclear Forensics Expertise Development Program, the NFGFP enables fellows to gain unique, hands-on experience through laboratory practicums and close interaction with technical and policy experts throughout the nuclear forensics community.

Complete award documentation can be found here.

Rickover Fellowship Program in Nuclear Engineering (RFP)

This program is designed to meet the needs of the Naval Reactors Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for appropriately trained personnel for the maintenance and development of science and engineering technology as it pertains to naval nuclear propulsion. The program will assist in preparing students for roles in naval nuclear propulsion and will support the broader objective of advancing fission energy development through the research efforts of the fellows. The technical areas with greatest interest include reactor physics, nuclear materials science and engineering, radiation shielding technology, thermal hydraulics, and computational fluid dynamics. The principle emphasis is on students seeking Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering, or in closely related fields.

Complete award documentation can be found here.

Nuclear Nonproliferation International Safeguards Fellowship Program (NNIS)

This program is designed to meet the needs of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for appropriately trained personnel in research and development in areas pertinent to Nuclear Nonproliferation and International Safeguards (NNIS). Increasing costs for graduate education and a high demand for nuclear-related scientists and engineers with a bachelor's degree have had a negative impact on the number of well-qualified students seeking advanced degrees in nuclear technologies and sciences. This problem has been particularly acute in programs in nuclear materials, engineering, nuclear science and engineering, radiochemistry and health physics, which has resulted in the closure of several programs and declining graduate school enrollments over the past two decades. This fellowship seeks to build collaboration between the leading nuclear technology programs and the schools studying the policy aspects of nuclear nonproliferation. The primary emphasis of this fellowship is to produce doctoral graduates who are familiar with both the technical and policy aspects of nonproliferation and international safeguards.

Complete award documentation can be found here.